By The Africa Institute

Carleton College, a private liberal arts college located in Northfield, Minnesota, USA, recently visited The Africa Institute to provide a unique educational experience for its students by forming collaborations with institutions in over twenty countries across the globe. Under the direction of Associate Professor of History Dr. John Willis, 19 students traveled to the Emirate of Sharjah, the Kingdom of Bahrain, and the Sultanate of Oman on an off-campus study program titled “History, Culture, and Commerce: Africa and Arabia” from late March to early June 2022.

The Africa Institute greeted and supported students with an itinerary including museum visits in Sharjah, a welcome dinner, and lectures in a 3-day session from March 28th, 2022, to March 30th, 2022, at the Africa Hall in Sharjah, engaging them in topics that represent The Africa Institutes’ areas of focus and study.

Professor Nidhi Mahajan, an assistant professor of Anthropology, nourished students with conceptual thoughts on contemporary connections between East Africa and the Middle East via the dhow trade. Mahajan received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Cornell University; her studies focus on the Indian Ocean’s transregional maritime connections, including shipping and commerce networks, ports, and their interplay with state sovereignty.

Following the Africa Institute’s diverse and unique contributions Professor Ahmad Sikainga, an African history professor at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, discussed slavery, oil, and wage labor in Qatar from the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries with students.

The closing lecture was conducted by Professor Abdul Mohammed Hussein Sheriff, who received a Ph.D. from the School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), the University of London, deliberating Africa’s reputation for being an isolated continent among outsiders and among Africans themselves. Students examined the start of the whole new world of sustenance, resources, opportunities, and perils, all while remaining tied to Africa.

Carleton College, a private liberal arts college located in Northfield, Minnesota, USA, recently visited The Africa Institute to provide a unique educational experience for its students by forming collaborations with institutions in over twenty countries across the globe. Under the direction of Associate Professor of History Dr. John Willis, 19 students traveled to the Emirate of Sharjah, the Kingdom of Bahrain, and the Sultanate of Oman on an off-campus study program titled “History, Culture, and Commerce: Africa and Arabia” from late March to early June 2022.

Carleton College, a private liberal arts college located in Northfield, Minnesota, USA, recently visited The Africa Institute to provide a unique educational experience for its students by forming collaborations with institutions in over twenty countries across the globe. Under the direction of Associate Professor of History Dr. John Willis, 19 students traveled to the Emirate of Sharjah, the Kingdom of Bahrain, and the Sultanate of Oman on an off-campus study program titled “History, Culture, and Commerce: Africa and Arabia” from late March to early June 2022.

The Africa Institute greeted and supported students with an itinerary including museum visits in Sharjah, a welcome dinner, and lectures in a 3-day session from March 28th, 2022, to March 30th, 2022, at the Africa Hall in Sharjah, engaging them in topics that represent The Africa Institutes’ areas of focus and study.

Professor Nidhi Mahajan, an assistant professor of Anthropology, nourished students with conceptual thoughts on contemporary connections between East Africa and the Middle East via the dhow trade. Mahajan received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Cornell University; her studies focus on the Indian Ocean’s transregional maritime connections, including shipping and commerce networks, ports, and their interplay with state sovereignty.

Following the Africa Institute’s diverse and unique contributions Professor Ahmad Sikainga, an African history professor at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, discussed slavery, oil, and wage labor in Qatar from the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries with students.

The closing lecture was conducted by Professor Abdul Mohammed Hussein Sheriff, who received a Ph.D. from the School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), the University of London, deliberating Africa’s reputation for being an isolated continent among outsiders and among Africans themselves. Students examined the start of the whole new world of sustenance, resources, opportunities, and perils, all while remaining tied to Africa.

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