By The Africa Institute

July 13, 2022

The Africa Institute is proud to announce its first cohort of Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship as part of its African Languages and Translation Program for the year 2022. 

This residency program is created in honor of the late Nigerian Professor Tejumola Olaniyan and his remarkable intellectual legacy in the field of African literature and critical theory. The residency grant is worth 45,000 AED in total inviting a competitive pool of applications from creative writers including novelists, short story writers, playwrights, poets, and scriptwriters related to Africa and the African diaspora. 

The residents will work on their proposed projects for a period of three months in Sharjah, UAE. 

 

The awardees for the 2022 Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship are:

Leanetse Seekoe

Leanetse Seekoe is an actress, playwright, director, and academic. She has an MA in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Fort Hare, and a BA in Theatre and Performance from the University of Cape Town. Her mission as a theater maker is to represent the subaltern from the perspective of black women. Through her writing, she attempts to regain the voices of black people by telling stories through the bodies of black women. Seekoe is keen to highlight themes such as feminism and mental health in the African community through storytelling, poetry, and movement to encourage the youth to become part of conversations around race and patriarchy in South Africa. 

Ruun Nuur

Ruun Nuur is an independent cinematic practitioner based in Columbus, Ohio. Her work and writing are hyper-focused on a Somali diasporic gaze with a keen interest in the practice of film preservation, more specifically, the African cinematic imagination. As a writer-in-residence, Ruun will examine Somali cinematic history in the 20th-century tracing and detailing records of Somali film pioneers, their inspiration, collaborators, and the location of their work today.

She is the co-founder of NO EVIL EYE CINEMA, a nomadic radical microcinema geared toward accessible film education and original programming. She is also the Managing Editor of the Field of Vision documentary-focused journal, Field Notes. She is currently shooting her debut feature-length documentary titled, ‘Cycles of Creation’ profiling the recovery and restoration of a long considered lost Somali motion picture alongside its director. Nuur was recently awarded the 2022 Film/Video Artist Residency Award recipient at Wexner Center for the Arts.

Sara Yassi

Sara Yassi completed her BA (Hons) in Philosophy and Theology from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. During her fellowship, she will work on a collection of short stories unified by the narration of a North African young woman, ‘Layla’ that traces her arrival until her untimely departure and exile from Tanzania. Sara’s work explores African generation-Z perspectives of politics, diasporic identity, self-love, belonging, and loss with underlying themes of history, nationalism, and first and second-hand postcolonial experiences. 

To learn more about the Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship and the application process, visit here.

The Africa Institute is proud to announce its first cohort of Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship as part of its African Languages and Translation Program for the year 2022. 

The Africa Institute is proud to announce its first cohort of Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship as part of its African Languages and Translation Program for the year 2022. 

This residency program is created in honor of the late Nigerian Professor Tejumola Olaniyan and his remarkable intellectual legacy in the field of African literature and critical theory. The residency grant is worth 45,000 AED in total inviting a competitive pool of applications from creative writers including novelists, short story writers, playwrights, poets, and scriptwriters related to Africa and the African diaspora. 

The residents will work on their proposed projects for a period of three months in Sharjah, UAE. 

 

The awardees for the 2022 Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship are:

Leanetse Seekoe

Leanetse Seekoe is an actress, playwright, director, and academic. She has an MA in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Fort Hare, and a BA in Theatre and Performance from the University of Cape Town. Her mission as a theater maker is to represent the subaltern from the perspective of black women. Through her writing, she attempts to regain the voices of black people by telling stories through the bodies of black women. Seekoe is keen to highlight themes such as feminism and mental health in the African community through storytelling, poetry, and movement to encourage the youth to become part of conversations around race and patriarchy in South Africa. 

Ruun Nuur

Ruun Nuur is an independent cinematic practitioner based in Columbus, Ohio. Her work and writing are hyper-focused on a Somali diasporic gaze with a keen interest in the practice of film preservation, more specifically, the African cinematic imagination. As a writer-in-residence, Ruun will examine Somali cinematic history in the 20th-century tracing and detailing records of Somali film pioneers, their inspiration, collaborators, and the location of their work today.

She is the co-founder of NO EVIL EYE CINEMA, a nomadic radical microcinema geared toward accessible film education and original programming. She is also the Managing Editor of the Field of Vision documentary-focused journal, Field Notes. She is currently shooting her debut feature-length documentary titled, ‘Cycles of Creation’ profiling the recovery and restoration of a long considered lost Somali motion picture alongside its director. Nuur was recently awarded the 2022 Film/Video Artist Residency Award recipient at Wexner Center for the Arts.

Sara Yassi

Sara Yassi completed her BA (Hons) in Philosophy and Theology from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. During her fellowship, she will work on a collection of short stories unified by the narration of a North African young woman, ‘Layla’ that traces her arrival until her untimely departure and exile from Tanzania. Sara’s work explores African generation-Z perspectives of politics, diasporic identity, self-love, belonging, and loss with underlying themes of history, nationalism, and first and second-hand postcolonial experiences. 

To learn more about the Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship and the application process, visit here.

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